Stories by Sharon Gaudin

  • Microsoft issues new fixes for Windows NT 4.0

    Microsoft has issued a set of fixes for its Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4.0, released last month. The fixes repair a bug that hinders some users from installing year 2000 compliant fixes that are part of the service pack. And another fix updates the Java virtual machine, bringing it into compliance with a federal court's order to make Microsoft's Java implementation follow Sun Microsystems' standard, per Sun's Java licence.

  • Technology has taken to the streets

    After 26 years of chasing mob bosses, drug lords and street gangs for the FBI, Richard J (Jack) Hunt, director of the Federal Law Enforcement Division at GTE Internetworking, is working on The Bastille, an international Web-based data sharing system being offered to law enforcement agencies. Hunt, 54, spoke with IDG's Sharon Gaudin on how the cops chase the robbers who are up on technology.

  • Y2k may stall windows 2000

    A growing number of analysts are warning users not to expect delivery of Windows 2000 before the middle of next year. That's at least six months after the delivery date pinpointed last week by Ed Muth, Microsoft's group product manager for Windows NT.

  • NT upgrade may force customers to add power

    One analyst is warning corporate customers planning to upgrade to Microsoft's Windows 2000 that they'll have to upgrade more than the operating system and the machine it runs on. Most will have to rebuild their NT domains, add bandwidth, convert networks completely to TCP/IP and upgrade desktop machines, according to Wayne Kernochan, senior vice president of platforms at Aberdeen Group.

  • Microsoft tries to counter Sun's Jini integration

    To keep rival Sun Microsystems from getting too much of a head start, Microsoft is creating its own software infrastructure to link network devices. Microsoft is working on technology to challenge Sun's Jini, a distributed computing technology designed to tie together the upcoming generation of smart devices that range from smart phones to video cameras to printers.

  • Microsoft tries to counter Sun integration

    To keep rival Sun Microsystems from getting too much of a head start, Microsoft is creating its own software infrastructure to link network devices. Microsoft is working on technology to challenge Sun's Jini, a distributed computing technology designed to tie together the upcoming generation of smart devices that range from smart phones to video cameras to printers. A source close to the effort confirmed published reports that the work is under way "across most departments" at Microsoft. "People in Microsoft are meeting about it daily," said the source, which called it a home networking effort.