Stories by Rob Enderle

  • 3 Ways Women Are Driving Change in Tech

    It can be hard for women at the top of the corporate ladder to really drive change. (Its a challenge for men, too.) Moderating a panel at the recent Women in Technology Summit, though, CIO.com columnist Rob Enderle discovered that women outside the C-suite are driving change at many technology companies. Credit a willingness to embrace analytics.

  • How IBM plans to get with the times

    The IBM Edge2014 infrastructure event hinted at how the company plans to use experience to its advantage. Far from burning out or fading away like an aging rock star, IBM intends to join today's young rockers on stage -- and steal the show.

  • How to resuscitate tech innovation at your company

    Maintaining or rediscovering innovation is difficult and often counter-intuitive for larger companies. However, CIO.com columnist Rob Enderele offers suggestions for how businesses can get back the innovation they lack.

  • How IBM plans to make Oracle obsolete

    IBM almost fell apart in the 1980s because it treated its customers like cash machines and not, well, customers. Oracle (and Sun) happily swept in to take this business. Now Oracle customers increasingly feel a similar squeeze -- and guess who's ready to take advantage of that?

  • Everything you know about enterprise security is wrong

    Whether you're talking about your network, your company's building or your home, a perimeter approach to security is no longer adequate. As McAfee discussed at the RSA Conference, you can't provide physical or electronic security simply by trying to prevent authorized access - you have to rethink all types to security to protect data and lives.

  • McAfee security report suggests 2014 will be a rough year

    Smartphones, social networks, PCs, servers, cloud services, governments and national infrastructure all face security risks in 2014, according to the latest McAfee security report. On, and virtual currencies are being used to fund serious crimes. So, who wants a new career?

  • Why IBM will win the war with Amazon Web Services

    Amazon dominates the Cloud, but IBM, strengthened by its SoftLayer acquisition, has unleashed a marketing campaign that fires on all cylinders. Whether IBM's Ccloud is, in fact, better may matter less than Amazon's ability to challenge a company that's made many competitors crumble over the past 102 years.

  • The State of HP, as told by Meg Whitman

    Hewlett-Packard is in the midst of a very public turnaround. This week, CEO Meg Whitman spoke to analysts about it. Her message -- and the way she delivered it -- should inspire HP customers and consumers at large.

  • Why HP's successful turnaround Is closer than it looks

    Hewlett-Packard's turnaround effort under CEO Meg Whitman, like an object in the rearview mirror, is closer than it appears. Credit the impending success on strategic partnerships, good hires and a broad view of the future of tech.

  • Why Microsoft's next CEO will fail

    Steve Ballmer isn't necessarily a bad CEO. After all, Microsoft's on strong financial footing. But Ballmer made enough bad product decisions - Zune, Kin, Vista and perhaps Surface - to suggest that Microsoft employees, swayed by a forced-ranking employee rating system, told him what he wanted to hear, not what he needed to hear. If that culture doesn't change, Ballmer's replacement will fare even worse than he did.

  • How Intel plans to destroy the legacy datacentre

    These days, and with the help of Cisco and EMC, Intel is dipping its toes into the networking and storage ends of the enterprise technology pool. Add this to Intel's server expertise and the data center of the future may be at hand.

  • What's next in IT: Intelligent systems, Stressed-out staffs

    The future of IT will be systems that are intelligent enough to detect and solve problems without human interaction, CIO.com columnist Rob Enderle conjectures. This will be great for analytics but bad for security--and it may leave IT workers reaching for Valium.

  • Opinion: How IBM beat up HP in Las Vegas

    IBM and Hewlett-Packard recently held events in Las Vegas. IBM went first and demonstrated how its customers will use Watson to change the world. HP responded by bringing executives on stage to talk about new products. HP can't let its competition keep winning.