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Stories by Mark Gibbs

  • Is Google guilty of enabling piracy?

    Last week's Backspin column on the United States government's attempts to extradite Richard O'Dwyer, a British citizen, to the U.S. to be prosecuted for "criminal copyright violation" for providing a website, TVShack.net (since shuttered by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE), that was an index of sites that hosted pirated television shows and movies got some great feedback.

  • A better Todo List with Backbone

    JavaScript, which has absolutely nothing to do with the Java language, has become a remarkable platform for elegantly solving programming problems and delivering effective solutions.

  • Trying to Rip DVDs

    In this column two weeks ago I mentioned that a friend on a mail list had asked, "What do people use to rip a DVD to their hard drive so they can, for example, watch it on a laptop or a tablet? This was something I'd assumed would come up in a Google search, but I had a surprisingly hard time finding a solution."

  • Ripping DVDs and making websites mobile

    After all these years DVD ripping is, it seems, still a topic of mystery and experimentation. I've tried ripping DVDs many times with varying degrees of success, and today a friend on my favorite email list just raised the topic again: "What do people on this list use to rip a DVD to their hard drive so they can, for example, watch it on a laptop or a tablet? This was something I'd assumed would come up in a Google search, but I had a surprisingly hard time finding a solution."

  • Four databases for iOS: Two good, two meh

    I'm trying to automate my beloved's business and, to this end, I need to create a system to generate receipts and trap client data. What I want to give her is a forms-based application that can run on an iPhone and or an iPad without being connected to the Internet.

  • Analysis: Microsoft - Too old and too big to survive?

    What browser do you prefer? According to w3schools.com, which tracks browser usage of people interested in Web technologies and hence more likely to try alternative tools, as of April this year, 38.3 per cent of us preferred Google's Chrome, 35.8 per cent went with Mozilla's Firefox, and 18.3 per cent were still using Microsoft's Internet Explorer (Apple's Safari and Opera were trailing way behind). Over the last year IE and Firefox have seen their shares decrease and only Chrome has gained share.