"Microsoft" news, interviews, and features

Features about Microsoft

  • The 10 worst Microsoft product names of all time

    If Microsoft had invented the iPod, it would have been called the Microsoft I-pod Pro 2005 Human Ear Professional Edition. The <cult-hit video that makes that assertion may have been a joke, but it rings true. And when word emerged that the video was a self-parody produced within Microsoft, the point was even clearer: The world's largest software developer just isn't very good at naming stuff.

  • Windows 7 in October? Here's the scoop

    Windows 7 may be hitting store shelves sooner than you think. Microsoft's latest operating system will be ready to roll this October, some information published by a British tech site suggests.

  • Desktop Virtualization and Licensing: IT Wary of Gotchas

    CIO Roxanne Reynolds-Lair of The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising wanted to bring both Macs and Windows to her college's students, administrative employees and teachers. She bought a MacBook Pro and tested new-fangled desktop virtualization software that allows her to run both Windows and OS X on a single machine.

  • How to run a legal copy of Vista for 120 days without activation

    Microsoft's Windows Vista can be used for as long as 120 days without agreeing to its product activation antipiracy software, the company confirmed Friday. That's four times longer than the 30 days the company has widely used as the maximum time span the operating system can be used before it shuts down.

  • The Microsoft-Novell Linux deal: Two years later

    Two years ago this month, Microsoft forged its controversial partnership with Novell that, among other things, had the two companies agreeing not to sue each other over intellectual property issues, in part to protect Suse Linux users over any patent litigation from Microsoft.

  • Serving it up to SMBs: What's on the menu?

    There are few people in the IT industry that would gloat about servicing a company of less than 50 people to their global peers. There are even fewer that would do it for a 10-seat operation. But in reality, the SMB market is the backbone of the Australian economy and deserves its time in the spotlight.